The Old Coach

Just like the past few afternoons there he was hanging over the rail shouting as we ran by words like, “Lengthen your stride,” “Run with your upper body,” “Concentrate,” “Lean into the curve.” We laughed. Who was this old man, what did he know? He had no imposing physique and did not look distinguished, just an odd-looking old man howling at the wind, unannounced or promoted. Our coaches never alerted us to anyone important coming by for our practice. Completing our quarters and halves we exited the track for the showers. Suddenly there he was right in front of us. We smiled and started to laugh in his face, but his intense stare blazed through our scorn and rejection. He told us we could do so much better. He looked at us and told us we were built for distance to run marathons, but that we needed the heart and endurance to follow direction and instill discipline in our training.

 

He told us he was gathering a new team, starting a new venture and looking for some everyday runners without affiliations, influence, or status. “In fact,” he informed us, “if you have medaled or achieved recognition I am not interested. I offer no uniforms or facilities, promotion, no quick pay-off or rewards. However, hard work, concentration, focus, intense training, discipline and direction are required. But with commitment and dedication to me you will receive an unequaled ultimate reward! You will become more than you could have ever imagined. You will receive that long term pay off. What do you think? Would you all be interested?”

 

I don’t know about you but at first glance this invitation does not seem too inviting. The old man making this offer does not appear distinguished. However, he was the first marathon winner from Greece in 1896. His name was Spiritdon Lewis, a respected long-distance coach. But the runners receiving the invitation to be trained by him didn’t know about his credentials.

 

The Old Coach

Two thousand years ago a movement was started the same way. Began by one man and starting from nothing with a meager, simplistic approach He gathered together some everyday runners (average men) to run the Marathon of Life.

 

He created/established…

 

  • A constant, consistent, continual, and ever-expanding life movement that changes everything forever.
  • A movement giving hope, comfort, peace, and inspiration to billions of people.
  • The greatest and most influential movement in the history of the world.
  • The plumb line for measuring all human events and endeavors, the power that divided time itself.
  • The defining moment in every life, where His ultimate sacrifice/His greatest achievement provided the most magnificent opportunity and catalyst for positive change.
  • A new beginning – the cornerstone for a meaningful life.

A Jewish carpenter from Nazareth without education, political standing, community influence or religious ties took a group of less than average men and in three short years changed the world.

 

Your response might be, “Well He was Jesus Christ – God in the flesh.” You are right, He was God in the flesh. But, we believe as you do that He was also man. A human with frailties and weaknesses just like you and me. But, unlike us, He never gave into the weaknesses of the flesh.

 

As a man Jesus accomplished what He did because He understood…

  • And accepted God’s plan for His life and His PACE of life.
  • And practiced God’s character, values, priorities, and gifts which He applied to every moment of life.
  • And embraced His purpose, who He was, and why He was here.
  • And committed to His mission, what He was to do and accomplish.
  • And never lost sight of His vision, how it would look when He fulfilled His purpose and achieved His mission.

Just like the past few afternoons there he was hanging over the rail shouting as we ran by words like, “Lengthen your stride,” “Run with your upper body,” “Concentrate,” “Lean into the curve.” We laughed. Who was this old man, what did he know? He had no imposing physique and did not look distinguished, just an odd-looking old man howling at the wind, unannounced or promoted. Our coaches never alerted us to anyone important coming by for our practice. Completing our quarters and halves we exited the track for the showers. Suddenly there he was right in front of us. We smiled and started to laugh in his face, but his intense stare blazed through our scorn and rejection. He told us we could do so much better. He looked at us and told us we were built for distance to run marathons, but that we needed the heart and endurance to follow direction and instill discipline in our training.

 

He told us he was gathering a new team, starting a new venture and looking for some everyday runners without affiliations, influence, or status. “In fact,” he informed us, “if you have medaled or achieved recognition I am not interested. I offer no uniforms or facilities, promotion, no quick pay-off or rewards. However, hard work, concentration, focus, intense training, discipline and direction are required. But with commitment and dedication to me you will receive an unequaled ultimate reward! You will become more than you could have ever imagined. You will receive that long term pay off. What do you think? Would you all be interested?”

 

I don’t know about you but at first glance this invitation does not seem too inviting. The old man making this offer does not appear distinguished. However, he was the first marathon winner from Greece in 1896. His name was Spiritdon Lewis, a respected long-distance coach. But the runners receiving the invitation to be trained by him didn’t know about his credentials.

 

The Old Coach

Two thousand years ago a movement was started the same way. Began by one man and starting from nothing with a meager, simplistic approach He gathered together some everyday runners (average men) to run the Marathon of Life.

 

 

He created/established…

 

  • A constant, consistent, continual, and ever-expanding life movement that changes everything forever.
  • A movement giving hope, comfort, peace, and inspiration to billions of people.
  • The greatest and most influential movement in the history of the world.
  • The plumb line for measuring all human events and endeavors, the power that divided time itself.
  • The defining moment in every life, where His ultimate sacrifice/His greatest achievement provided the most magnificent opportunity and catalyst for positive change.
  • A new beginning – the cornerstone for a meaningful life.

A Jewish carpenter from Nazareth without education, political standing, community influence or religious ties took a group of less than average men and in three short years changed the world.

 

Your response might be, “Well He was Jesus Christ – God in the flesh.” You are right, He was God in the flesh. But, we believe as you do that He was also man. A human with frailties and weaknesses just like you and me. But, unlike us, He never gave into the weaknesses of the flesh.

 

As a man Jesus accomplished what He did because He understood…

  • And accepted God’s plan for His life and His PACE of life.
  • And practiced God’s character, values, priorities, and gifts which He applied to every moment of life.
  • And embraced His purpose, who He was, and why He was here.
  • And committed to His mission, what He was to do and accomplish.
  • And never lost sight of His vision, how it would look when He fulfilled His purpose and achieved His mission.

Just like the past few afternoons there he was hanging over the rail shouting as we ran by words like, “Lengthen your stride,” “Run with your upper body,” “Concentrate,” “Lean into the curve.” We laughed. Who was this old man, what did he know? He had no imposing physique and did not look distinguished, just an odd-looking old man howling at the wind, unannounced or promoted. Our coaches never alerted us to anyone important coming by for our practice. Completing our quarters and halves we exited the track for the showers. Suddenly there he was right in front of us. We smiled and started to laugh in his face, but his intense stare blazed through our scorn and rejection. He told us we could do so much better. He looked at us and told us we were built for distance to run marathons, but that we needed the heart and endurance to follow direction and instill discipline in our training.

 

He told us he was gathering a new team, starting a new venture and looking for some everyday runners without affiliations, influence, or status. “In fact,” he informed us, “if you have medaled or achieved recognition I am not interested. I offer no uniforms or facilities, promotion, no quick pay-off or rewards. However, hard work, concentration, focus, intense training, discipline and direction are required. But with commitment and dedication to me you will receive an unequaled ultimate reward! You will become more than you could have ever imagined. You will receive that long term pay off. What do you think? Would you all be interested?”

 

I don’t know about you but at first glance this invitation does not seem too inviting. The old man making this offer does not appear distinguished. However, he was the first marathon winner from Greece in 1896. His name was Spiritdon Lewis, a respected long-distance coach. But the runners receiving the invitation to be trained by him didn’t know about his credentials.

 

The Old Coach

Two thousand years ago a movement was started the same way. Began by one man and starting from nothing with a meager, simplistic approach He gathered together some everyday runners (average men) to run the Marathon of Life.

 

 

He created/established…

 

  • A constant, consistent, continual, and ever-expanding life movement that changes everything forever.
  • A movement giving hope, comfort, peace, and inspiration to billions of people.
  • The greatest and most influential movement in the history of the world.
  • The plumb line for measuring all human events and endeavors, the power that divided time itself.
  • The defining moment in every life, where His ultimate sacrifice/His greatest achievement provided the most magnificent opportunity and catalyst for positive change.
  • A new beginning – the cornerstone for a meaningful life.

A Jewish carpenter from Nazareth without education, political standing, community influence or religious ties took a group of less than average men and in three short years changed the world.

 

Your response might be, “Well He was Jesus Christ – God in the flesh.” You are right, He was God in the flesh. But, we believe as you do that He was also man. A human with frailties and weaknesses just like you and me. But, unlike us, He never gave into the weaknesses of the flesh.

 

As a man Jesus accomplished what He did because He understood…

  • And accepted God’s plan for His life and His PACE of life.
  • And practiced God’s character, values, priorities, and gifts which He applied to every moment of life.
  • And embraced His purpose, who He was, and why He was here.
  • And committed to His mission, what He was to do and accomplish.
  • And never lost sight of His vision, how it would look when He fulfilled His purpose and achieved His mission.